Billie Kelpin is the left-handed author of "Lucky, the Left-Pawed Puppy".  Her writing includes essays, short stories, and a novel, "If Not for War" scheduled to be published in 2018.  Her short story, "Sylvia" has been published in The Lost Coast Literary Review Magazine and her essay, "A Gift from My Daughter," was published as a winner in the Arizona Literary Magazine Contest.  Billie's non-fiction articles can be found on hubpages.com and wanderwisdom.com.  She is a proud member of Orange County Writers. 

Before devoting her time to writing full time, Billie has worn many hats.  She has been a teacher of the deaf in a variety of educational settings from preschool through adult education.  She is proud to have also worked for many years as a sign language interpreter for high school and college students and to have been a professional writing tutor for the TRIO Student Support Services program serving first generation, low income, and special needs college students.  

Billie received her Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Deaf Education and has done graduate work in Teaching English as a Second Language. The process of language acquisition has been a fascination for this author since that time.  It was a natural transition, therefore,  for her company, Language Rocks, (formerly Windmill Works) to begin in 1995 featuring online language and vocabulary learning games developed by Billie and her husband, software engineer, Mike Olmon.  

When asked why  Billie wrote "Lucky, the Left Pawed Puppy," she states: "As a left-handed person, I approach many tasks with my right hand, just as all left-handers do because we live in a right-handed world.   I find it a bit amusing to interact with my physical environment differently than right handers. (Hugging sometimes looks more like a boxing match with all the bobbing and weaving).  However, I didn't realize how much left handers adapt until I was in my 20s. Being left-handed then became like sharing a secret.  But it's a secret only a few left handers are aware of.  Like many other minorities, left handers take for granted their skill in adroitly adjusting to the world around them.  I wanted to create a hero for those do adapt, and thus "Lucky..."  becomes a story for all of us! 


Billie Kelpin believes that when the world accepts a person's difference and makes accommodations for those special needs, it allows that person to excel.   She feels that awareness will help parents and teachers when introducing a child to a new skill. (A tennis racket or a bat placed in the left hand might release an inner champion!)    It is also her hope in writing this story that little left-handers will embrace their obvious dominant orientation because our 
​difference is often our greatest strength.